Massive Box Office for Black Panther with $361 million in global sales

All hail the king.

Black Panther,” Marvel’s first film directed by an African-American, brought in an estimated $192 million for its three-day debut in North America this weekend. That’s the fifth biggest opening of all time.

The opening for the film starring Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan did not just shatter expectations, it broke multiple box office records too.

It blew away the record for the largest opening for an African-American director. That belonged to F. Gary Gray and “The Fate of the Furious,” which opened to $98 million last April.

Disney estimates that the film will bring in $218 million domestically for the four day holiday weekend. The film brought in an opening of $361 million around the world.

“Black Panther” also shattered the record for an opening in February, which belonged to “Deadpool,” the R-rated superhero film from 20th Century Fox that brought in $132 million when it opened in 2016.

It is the second biggest opening for a Marvel Studios film, behind 2012’s “The Avengers.” It out paced other huge hits like “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Captain America: Civil War” and “Iron Man 3.” It is the studio’s 18th straight number one opening.

The record-breaking weekend is watershed moment for Hollywood. With “Black Panther” reaching box office heights that have eluded other African-American titles, the film’s totals could impact change in the industry by encouraging diversity in front of and behind the camera.

The film is an “important milestone,” according to comScore (SCOR) senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian.

“‘Black Panther’ exceeded even the grandest box office expectations while simultaneously breaking down cinematic barriers and marking a turning point in the evolution of the genre,” he said.

The film garnered an “A+” CinemaScore from audiences and a near perfect 97% score on review site Rotten Tomatoes, which makes it one of the best-reviewed superhero movies of all time.

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BLOG SERIES DISCOVERY: I’m About This Daddy-ish” – Daddies, Daughters and Guns: My Reality of Protection

We regularly research the work done by our social media friends. In our research, we discovered this rich collection of content by Kenneth Braswell, the Executive Director of Fathers Incorporated, entitled ‘Dad’s Pad: All Things Fatherhood“.
This extensive array of wisdom for fathers is sure to help our readers, so check it out!
Mr. Braswell’s newest blog series “I’m About This Daddy-ish”, Braswell tackles “Daddies, Daughters and Guns: My Reality of Protection”. This post is a powerful check contrasting the social narrative to what happens when YOUR child is holding the gun. Check it out HERE.
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Dads Pad is a Top 100 Blog

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Dadspadblog is amongst the best sites focused on content related to fatherhood

13312921_10206639088231881_7766855563682463822_nAbout Kenneth Braswell

Born and raised in Brooklyn Kenneth currently resides in Atlanta, and is the father of four beautiful children; uncle, grandfather; and husband to beautiful wife, Tracy.

With more than 25 years of community development experience, Braswell is the Executive Director of Fathers Incorporated (FI), a not-for-profit organization that serves as a leader in the promotion of Responsible Fatherhood. Additionally, Braswell serves as the Director of the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse (NRFC) under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Kenneth Braswell is the author of the children’s book “Daddy There’s a Noise Outside”, a book that teaches parents how to speak to their children about protesting injustices in their community. Braswell will be releasing his latest children’s book “Daddy’s Feeling Blue” June 2016. In addition to writing books, Mr. Braswell is also the creator of two powerful documentaries “Spit’in Anger” and “Dark Hearts”.

 

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Assemblymember Mike Gipson Takes on California’s Literacy Crisis with AB 2683

 

AB 2683, as introduced, Gipson. Arts education: pupils from extremely low income communities: grant program.

Existing law establishes a system of public elementary and secondary schools in this state and authorizes local educational agencies throughout the state to operate schools and provide instruction to pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive. Existing law establishes in state government the Arts Council and imposes various duties on the council to foster arts development and to award grants and prizes to individuals and organizations in the arts, as provided.

This bill would create the California Student Author Art and Literacy Project as a grant program for the benefit of pupils from extremely low income communities. The bill would appropriate $1,000,000 from the General Fund to the Arts Council in the 2018–19 fiscal year for purposes of providing grant awards to nonprofit organizations for purposes of the program, as specified. The bill would require a grant recipient, during the 2019–20 and 2020–21 school years, to establish a pupil author book publishing program for pupils in grades 6 to 12, inclusive, from housing developments with a median income level of 30% of area median income.

The bill would require a grant recipient to provide participating pupils an opportunity to write, edit, and promote a short story and would require a grant recipient to operate weekly pupil author workshops, as provided. The bill would require the Arts Council, not later than January 1, 2022, to report to the Legislature on the outcomes of the California Student Author Art and Literacy Project.

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The bill was inspired by programs such as the upcoming Imperial Courts Resident Student Authors Book Signing happening Thursday, February 22, 2018 at Cal State Dominguez Hills, hosted by CJ Miller, President of H-Eleven:1 Innovation, LLC, home of PHABB5.

The mission of Phabb5 is to reinvigorate, inspire, and unite communities at their core by creating turnkey comprehensive book publishing programs that help students standout during every phase of life.

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‘Black Panther’ Could Make as Much as $200 Million in Massive U.S. Debut

Disney-Marvel’s “Black Panther” is poised to shatter box office records for February, with updated forecasts from Disney in the $172 million-$198 million range in North America during the four-day Presidents Day weekend.
That’s significantly above the first tracking on Jan. 25 for the tentpole, which initially placed the debut in the $100 million-$120 million range for the Feb. 16-19 period. The projections are higher even than tracking estimates earlier this week showing the film would make as much as $170 million.
“Black Panther” should easily break the Presidents Day weekend record of $152 million, set in 2016 by “Deadpool.” The second-highest debut for the four-day holiday was for “Fifty Shades of Grey,” which opened in 2015 to $93 million.

 

The latest Marvel entry dominated in Thursday preview showings, earning a muscular $25.2 million. The Thursday opening numbers represent a new high-water mark for the month of February. They are roughly double the previous record of $12.7 million, which was set by “Deadpool.” It also ranks as the second-biggest preview gross for a Marvel title, behind only “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” which scored $27.6 million from its previews.

The film is also shattering long-held views that films rooted in black culture don’t sell well overseas. “Black Panther” blasted off to $23.2 million overseas after opening in 17 locations, including the United Kingdom, South Korea, and France. “Black Panther,” which carries a $200 million budget, debuted to $7.2 million in the U.K., $4.7 million in South Korea, $2 million in Taiwan, $1.6 million in France, and $1.1 million in Hong Kong.
Screenings started Tuesday in a trio of international markets in the U.K., Hong Kong, and Taiwan, followed by Wednesday launches in France, Italy, Korea, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Indonesia. Most other markets will be open this weekend, followed by Russia on Feb. 22, Japan on March 1, and China on March 9.
The superhero tentpole, starring Chadwick Boseman, will play in more than 4,000 North American theaters, including 3,300 3D locations and more than 400 Imax screens.
The film has captured the zeitgeist, setting records for advanced ticket sales. Fandango on Thursday said the picture had become the fourth-highest selling pre-seller in its history, behind “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.” Fandango also reports it accounted for 36% of opening night sales for “Black Panther.”
Other Fandango records broken: top superhero preseller, and top February and first-quarter preseller.
A Fandango survey found that 61% are considering repeat viewings of “Black Panther,” which could bode well for the film’s box office performance in the coming weeks.
Around the country, civic groups have organized fundraisers to pack theaters with children to see the film. The #BlackPantherChallenge is among the number of grassroots efforts by people across the country to support the film, and ensure children see the picture.

It’s a film of many firsts: “Black Panther’s” protagonist T’Challa (Boseman), the king of a secret African nation, is the first black character to lead a Marvel Cinematic Universe movie, while Ryan Coogler is the first black director of a Marvel film. The large cast of black actors includes Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, and Forest Whitaker.
“Black Panther” hits theaters at a time when most major movies are still being anchored by white male stars. According to a study by the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, of the 100 highest-grossing films of 2016, roughly a quarter lacked any black characters.

SOURCE: VARIETY

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2017 TOP 200 ART COLLECTORS

Art collectors at the uppermost echelons can be a secretive coterie. In an age when some are throwing open doors to gleaming new private museums and revealing their holdings with great fanfare, there are others whose names will never appear on a list like this—because they want no one outside their inner circle to know of their exploits.

That is why it was so striking when Yusaku Maezawa posted on Instagram about the Jean-Michel Basquiat painting he purchased for $110 million at Sotheby’s in May. He did not, like many others have in the past, whisper about it to fellow collectors who then passed it down to the chattering classes. He did not grant a news-making exclusive about it to the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal. He revealed it—just like that—to anyone who might have been looking at one of the world’s most popular social-media platforms.
In that spirit, for the 28th edition of the ARTnews “Top 200 Collectors” list, we asked the connoisseurs in our survey—some of them veterans and others new to the enterprise—to tell us a bit about themselves. What are some of the pieces they have acquired over the past year? Who inspired them to start collecting? Was there ever an artwork that got away? The answers we received are grand.

In the past year, in addition to a six-panel canvas by David Hockney (Woldgate Woods, 24, 25, and 26 October 2006, dated 2006), David Geffen acquired four pieces by midcareer painter Marc Grotjahn. The New York Times recently reported that Geffen owns six of the artist’s paintings and lost out on one that sold privately for $22 million. His devotion to Grotjahn is clear: “He’s the most important artist of his generation,” Geffen told the Times.

Roman Abramovich
London; Moscow; New York
Steel; mining; investments; technology; professional soccer (Chelsea Football Club)
Impressionism; modern, postwar, and contemporary art
Haryanto Adikoesoemo
Jakarta, Indonesia
Energy; logistics; real estate
Indonesian, Asian, and Western modern and contemporary art
Mohammed Afkhami
Dubai; Gstaad, Switzerland; London; New York
Private equity; real estate; commodities
Modern and contemporary Iranian and international art
Paul Allen
Seattle
Investments; philanthropy
Impressionism; Old Masters; modern and contemporary art
Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen and Marc Andreessen
Palo Alto, California
Philanthropy; entrepreneur
Postwar and contemporary art
María Asunción Aramburuzabala
Mexico City
Beverages; investments
Modern and contemporary art
Hélène and Bernard Arnault
Paris
Luxury goods (LVMH)
Contemporary art
Laura and John Arnold
Houston
Hedge fund
Modern art; African art; Old Masters
Laurent Asscher
Monaco
Investments
Modern and contemporary art
Hans Rasmus Astrup
Oslo
Shipping; finance-related activities
Contemporary art
Candace Carmel Barasch
New York
Real estate
Contemporary art
Maria Arena and William Jr. Bell
Los Angeles
Television production
Modern and contemporary art
Tracey and Bruce R. Berkowitz
Miami
Investment fund management (Fairholme Capital Group)
Contemporary art
Ernesto Bertarelli
Gstaad, Switzerland
Biotech, Investments
Modern and contemporary art
Debra and Leon Black
New York
Investment banking
Old Masters; Impressionism; modern painting; Chinese sculpture; contemporary art; works on paper
Len Blavatnik
London; New York
Investments (media, industrials, and real estate)
Modern and contemporary art
Neil G. Bluhm
Chicago
Real estate
Postwar and contemporary art
Barbara Bluhm-Kaul and Don Kaul
Chicago
Real estate; Law (retired)
Postwar and contemporary art
Lauren and Mark Booth
Connecticut
Investments
Contemporary art, especially outdoor sculpture
Karen and Christian Boros
Berlin
Advertising; Communications; Publishing
Contemporary art
Botín Family
Santander, Spain
Banking
Contemporary art
Irma and Norman Braman
Miami Beach
Automobile dealerships
Modern and contemporary art
Udo Brandhorst
Munich
Insurance
Postwar and contemporary art
Peter M. Brant
Greenwich, Connecticut
Newsprint manufacturing
Contemporary art; design; furniture
Edythe L. and Eli Broad
Los Angeles
Philanthropy (The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation and The Broad Foundation)
Contemporary art
Estrellita and Daniel Brodsky
New York
Real estate
Modern and contemporary Latin American and international art; drawings and paintings by architects, especially Le Corbusier
James Keith (JK) Brown and Eric Diefenbach
New York; Ridgefield, Connecticut
Investments; Law
Contemporary art
Joop van Caldenborgh
Wassenaar, the Netherlands
Chemical industry (Caldic)
Modern and contemporary art, including sculpture, photography, artists’ books, video, and installations
Edouard Carmignac
Paris
Asset management
Contemporary art
Pierre Chen
Taipei
High-tech industry
Modern and contemporary art
Adrian Cheng
Hong Kong
Retail; Real estate (K11 , New World Development)
Contemporary Chinese and global art
Halit Cingillioglu and Kemal Has Cingillioglu
London; Monaco
Banking
Impressionism; modern, postwar, and contemporary art
Ella Fontanals-Cisneros
Gstaad, Switzerland; Madrid; Miami
Investments; Real estate; Telecommunications; Technology
Global contemporary art, with an emphasis on conceptual art, photography, and video; art from Latin America, especially geometric abstraction, Cuban art, and contemporary and emerging artists
Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and Gustavo A. Cisneros
Caracas, Venezuela; Dominican Republic; New York
Media; Entertainment; Telecommunications; Consumer products; Travel resorts
Modern and contemporary Latin American art; 19th-century traveler artists to Latin America; colonial art and objects from Latin America; Amazonian ethnographic objects

Alexandra and Steven A. Cohen
Greenwich, Connecticut
Investments
Impressionism; modern and contemporary art
Isabel and Agustín Coppel
Culiacán, Mexico
Retail
International art
Eduardo F. Costantini
Buenos Aires
Asset management; Real estate
Modern and contemporary Latin American art
Dimitris Daskalopoulos
Athens
Financial services and investment company
Contemporary art
Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz
Key Biscayne, Florida
Coca-Cola bottling in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean
Contemporary art
Eric de Rothschild
Paris and Pauillac, France
Banking
Old Masters, modern and contemporary art
Tiqui Atencio Demirdjian
London; Venezuela
Investments
Modern and contemporary art; Latin American art; 19th- and early 20th-century African tribal masks from Gabon, Cote d’Ivoire, and Mali
Beth Rudin DeWoody
Los Angeles; New York; West Palm Beach, Florida
Real estate; Philanthropy
Modern and contemporary art
Lonti Ebers
New York; Toronto
Real estate
Contemporary art
George Economou
Athens
Investments; Shipping (DryShips)
Modern, postwar, and contemporary art
Stefan T. and Gael Neeson Edlis
Aspen, Colorado; Chicago
Plastics manufacturing (retired)
Postwar and contemporary art
Carl Gustaf Ehrnrooth
Helsinki
Construction; Investments
Contemporary Scandinavian, European, and American art
Eisenberg Family
New Jersey; New York
Retail (Bed Bath & Beyond)
Contemporary art
Lawrence J. Ellison
Woodside, California
Software
Late 19th- and early 20th-century European art; ancient to early 20th-century Japanese art
Caryl and Israel Englander
New York
Hedge fund
Modern, postwar, and contemporary art; contemporary photography
Bridgitt and Bruce Evans
Boston
Philanthropy (VIA Art Fund); Private equity (Summit Partners)
Contemporary art
Susan and Leonard Feinstein
New York and Long Island, New York; Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
Retail (Bed Bath & Beyond)
Modern and contemporary art
Frank J. III Fertitta and Lorenzo Fertitta
Las Vegas
Casinos (Station Casinos); Professional fighting (Ultimate Fighting Championship)
Modern and contemporary art
Randi and Robert Fisher
San Francisco
Retail (Gap Inc.)
Contemporary art and photography
Aaron I. Fleischman
Miami Beach; New York
Law; Investments
Modern and contemporary art
Michael C. and Jennifer Rice Forman
Philadelphia
Investment fund management (FS Investments)
Modern and contemporary art
Amanda and Glenn R. Fuhrman
New York
Investments (MSD Capital)
Contemporary art
Gabriela and Ramiro Garza
Aspen, Colorado; Mexico City
Energy (Grupo R)
Contemporary art
Christy and Bill Gautreaux
Kansas City, Missouri
Privately held non-bank holdings company
Contemporary art
David Geffen
Los Angeles
Film and record executive; Investments
Modern and contemporary art, especially Abstract Expressionism
Yassmin and Sasan Ghandehari
London
Investments (real estate and industrials)
Impressionism; postwar and contemporary art
Danny Goldberg
Sydney
Real estate; Investments
European and American contemporary art
Noam Gottesman
New York
Hedge fund
Postwar and contemporary art
Laurence Graff
Gstaad, Switzerland
Jewelry
Modern and contemporary art
Kenneth C. Griffin
Chicago
Hedge fund
Post-Impressionism
Florence and Daniel Guerlain
Paris
Inheritance (perfume); Philanthropy (Contemporary Drawing Prize)
Contemporary art, especially drawing
Agnes Gund
Kent, Connecticut; New York; Peninsula, Ohio
Inheritance
Modern and contemporary art
Christine and Andrew Hall
Palm Beach, Florida
Financial management
Contemporary art
Diane and Bruce Halle
Arizona
Tires (Discount Tire Company)
Latin American art; contemporary sculpture
(Prince) Hans-Adam II von und zu Liechtenstein
Vaduz, Liechtenstein
Inheritance
Old Masters
Janine and J. Tomilson Hill
New York
Investment banking
Renaissance bronzes; Old Masters; postwar and contemporary art
Marguerite Hoffman
Dallas
Private investments
Postwar American and European art; illuminated medieval manuscripts; Chinese monochromes
Maja Hoffmann
Zurich
Inheritance (pharmaceuticals)
Contemporary art
Frank Huang
Taipei
Computer hardware
Chinese porcelain; Impressionist and modern painting
Dakis Joannou
Athens
Construction
Contemporary art
Edward “Ned” Johnson III
Boston
Finance (Fidelity Investments)
19th- and 20th-century American painting, furniture, and decorative arts; Asian art and ceramics
Pamela J. Joyner and Alfred J. Giuffrida
San Francisco and Sonoma, California
Investments
African-American abstract art; art of the African diaspora; contemporary South African art
Viatcheslav Moshe Kantor
London; Moscow
Fertilizer (Acron Group); President of the European Jewish Congress
Russian and Jewish art of the 20th century; contemporary Russian art
Nasser David Khalili
London
Real estate; Investments
Aramaic documents (353–324 B.C.); Art of the Islamic lands; enamels of the world since the 18th century; Hajj and the arts of pilgrimage (700–2000); Japanese art of the Meiji period; Japanese kimonos since the 18th century; Spanish damascened metalworks (1850–1900); Swedish textiles (1700–1900)
Alison and Peter W. Klein
Eberdingen-Nussdorf, Germany
Real estate (Peter Klein Real Estate)
Contemporary painting and photography; Aboriginal art
Jill and Peter Kraus
New York and Dutchess County, New York
Investment management
Contemporary art
Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis
New York
Finance; Investments
Modern and contemporary art; 18th-century French decorative arts and French Art Deco furniture
Ananda Krishnan
France; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Finance; Investments
modern art
Grażyna Kulczyck
Poznań, Poland
Investments; Entrepreneur (Stary Browar Commerce, Art and Business Centre)
Postwar and contemporary Polish and international art
Pierre Lagrange
London
Hedge fund
Postwar and contemporary art
Guy Laliberté
Ibiza, Spain; Montreal
Creative ventures (Red Moon Group)
Contemporary art
Barbara and Jon Landau
New York and Westchester County, New York
Entertainment
Renaissance and Baroque painting and sculpture; 19th-century French and English painting
Steven Latner and Michael Latner
Toronto
Real estate
Modern and contemporary art
Joseph Lau
Hong Kong
Real estate
Modern and contemporary art, especially Warhol
Thomas Lau
Hong Kong
Real estate
Modern and contemporary art
Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder
New York and Wainscott, New York; Palm Beach, Florida; Paris; Washington, D.C.
Cosmetics (Estée Lauder Companies)
Antiquities; medieval art; arms and armor; Old Masters; 20th-century decorative arts; Austrian and German Expressionism; modern masters; postwar German and Italian art; contemporary art
Leonard A. Lauder
New York
Cosmetics (Estée Lauder Companies)
Cubism
Liz and Eric Lefkofsky
Glencoe, Illinois
Technology investor; philanthropy
Contemporary art
Petra and Stephen Levin
Miami Beach
Beverages , restaurants
Modern and contemporary art
Barbara and Aaron Levine
Washington, D.C.
Law practice
Conceptual art
Li Lin
Hangzhou, China
Fashion (JNBY)
International contemporary art
Margaret Munzer Loeb and Daniel S. Loeb
New York
Hedge fund
Postwar and contemporary art; feminist art
Eugenio López Alonso
Los Angeles; Mexico City
Beverages (Grupo Jumex)
Contemporary art
Jack Ma
Hangzhou, China
E-commerce (AliBaba)
Modern and contemporary art
Yusaku Maezawa
Chiba City, Japan
Online retail
Contemporary art
Maramotti Family
Reggio Emilia, Italy
Fashion
Art informel; Arte Povera; transavanguardia; neo-Expressionism; New Geometry; conceptual art; contemporary art
Maurice Marciano
Los Angeles
Retail (Guess)
Contemporary art
Martin Z. Margulies
Key Biscayne, Florida
Real-estate development
Modern and contemporary art
Cheech Marin
Los Angeles
Actor
Chicano art
Donald B. Marron
New York
Private equity
Modern and contemporary art
David Martinez
London; New York
Investment management
Modern and contemporary art
Susan and Larry Marx
Aspen, Colorado; Marina del Rey, California
Investments; Real estate (retired)
Postwar and contemporary art, especially Abstract Expressionism and works on paper
Dimitri Mavrommatis
Paris
Investment banking; Asset management
Modern and postwar art
Raymond J. and Crystal McCrary McGuire
New York
Finance
African American and African art
John S. Middleton
Philadelphia
Manufacturing
19th- and 20th-century American art
Leonid Mikhelson
Moscow
Gas (Novatek)
Impressionism; modern and contemporary art
Julie and Edward J. Minskoff
New York
Real estate
Postwar, Pop, and contemporary American and European art
Victoria and Samuel I. Jr. Newhouse
New York
Publishing
Modern and contemporary art
Niarchos Family
St. Moritz, Switzerland
Shipping; Finance
Old Masters; Impressionism; modern and contemporary art
Genny and Selmo Nissenbaum
Rio de Janeiro
Investments; Real estate
Minimalist art; Brazilian art
Takeo Obayashi
Tokyo
Construction contracting, engineering, design
Contemporary art
Daniel Och
Scarsdale, New York
Hedge fund management
Modern and contemporary art
Maja Oeri
Basel, Switzerland
Inheritance (pharmaceuticals)
Contemporary art
Thomas Olbricht
Berlin
Doctor of medicine
Contemporary art; Wunderkammer objects; stamps
Michael Ovitz
Los Angeles
Technology; Finance; Investments
Modern and contemporary art; Ming furniture; African art
Bernardo Paz
Brumadinho, Brazil
Mining
Contemporary art
Andrea and José Olympio Pereira
São Paulo
Investment banking
Modern and contemporary Brazilian art
Marsha and Jeffrey Perelman
Palm Beach, Florida; Wynnewood, Pennsylvania
Manufacturing
Postwar and contemporary art
Ronald O. Perelman
New York
Finance
Modern and contemporary art
Augusto Perfetti
Lugano, Switzerland
Confectionery
Contemporary art
Amy and John Phelan
Aspen, Colorado; Palm Beach, Florida
Investments (MSD Capital)
Contemporary art
François Pinault
Paris
Luxury goods (Kering); Auctions (Christie’s)
Contemporary art
Ann and Ron Pizzuti
Columbus, Ohio; New York; Orlando, Florida
Real-estate development (The Pizzuti Companies)
Modern and contemporary art; design
Sabine and Hasso Plattner
Heidelberg, Germany
Software (SAP AG Software Company)
East German art; Impressionism

Miuccia and Patrizio Bertelli Prada
Milan
Fashion
Contemporary art
Lisa and John Pritzker
San Francisco
Hotels; Investments
Photography; modern and contemporary art
Penny and Bryan Traubert Pritzker
Chicago
Investments; Technology; Real estate development and management
Contemporary art
Sultan Sooud Al Qassemi
Sharjah, UAE
Inheritance; Entrepreneur
Modern and contemporary Arab art
Qiao Zhibing
Shanghai
Entertainment; Philanthropy (Tank Shanghai art center)
International contemporary art
Cindy and Howard Rachofsky
Dallas
Investments
Postwar and contemporary American and European art; postwar Japanese and Korean art
Emily and Mitchell Rales
New York; Potomac, Maryland
Tool industry
Modern and contemporary art
Steven Rales
Washington, D.C.
Tool industry
Impressionism; modern and contemporary art
Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
Turin, Italy
Industrial manufacturing; Renewable energy; Energy efficiency
Contemporary art
Bob Rennie
Vancouver, British Columbia
Real estate
Contemporary art
Louise and Leonard Riggio
New York and Bridgehampton, New York; Palm Beach, Florida
Retail (Barnes & Noble)
Modern and contemporary art
Ellen and Michael Ringier
Zurich
Publishing
Contemporary art; Russian avant-garde art
Linnea Conrad Roberts and George Roberts
Atherton, California
Finance (KKR)
Contemporary art
Aby J. Rosen
New York and Southampton, New York
Real estate
Modern and contemporary art; contemporary photography
Hilary and Wilbur L. Ross Jr.
Palm Beach, Florida; Washington, D.C.
Author; U.S. Secretary of Commerce
Surrealism; modern and contemporary art, especially Chinese and Vietnamese
Rubell Family
Miami
Real estate; Hotels
Contemporary art
Betty and Isaac Rudman
Dominican Republic
Imports; Manufacturing (home appliances)
Latin American art; numismatics; pre-Columbian art
Dmitry Rybolovlev
Moscow
Fertilizer
19th- and 20th-century painting
Joseph Safra
New York; São Paulo
Banking
Old Masters; Impressionism
Lily Safra
Geneva
Inheritance
19th- and 20th-century art
Elham and Tony Salamé
Beirut
Retail luxury stores; Philanthropy (Aïshti Foundation)
Contemporary art
Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Conglomerate interests (Golden Harvest Group and Gulf International Finance Limited); philanthropy (Samdani Art Foundation and Dhaka Art Summit)
Modern and contemporary South Asian and international art; antique silver; design
Marieke and Pieter Sanders
Haarlem, the Netherlands
Corporate-law practice
Dutch art; sculpture; contemporary American and European art
Vicki and Roger Sant
New York; Washington, D.C.
Energy
Washington, D.C.: late 19th-century art focused on Nabi; New York: contemporary art
Louisa Stude Sarofim
Houston; Santa Fe, New Mexico
Investments
Modern and contemporary art; works on paper
Tatsumi Sato
Hiroshima, Japan
Manufacturing (radiators)
Contemporary art; primitive art; antique textiles
Sheri and Howard Schultz
Seattle
Beverages (Starbucks Coffee Company); Philanthropy (Schultz Family Foundation)
Contemporary art
Helen and Charles Schwab
Woodside, California
U.S. investment firm
Modern and contemporary art
Marianne and Alan Schwartz
Birmingham, Michigan
Law practice
Old Masters; European and American 19th-century and early 20th-century prints
Uli Sigg
Mauensee, Switzerland
Media
Contemporary art, especially Chinese
Peter Simon
London
Retail (Monsoon)
Contemporary art
Elizabeth and Frederick Singer
Great Falls, Virginia
Internet education
Modern and contemporary art
Eric Smidt
Los Angeles
Tool industry
New York School; contemporary art
Jerry I. and Katherine G. Farley Speyer
New York
Real estate
Contemporary art
Susana and Ricardo Steinbruch
São Paulo
Textiles (Vicunha Textil)
Modern and contemporary art
Judy and Michael H. Steinhardt
New York and Mount Kisco, New York
Investment firm
Classical antiquities; modern art, especially drawings; Peruvian feathered textiles
Gayle and Paul Stoffel
Aspen, Colorado; Dallas
Investments
Contemporary art
Norah and Norman Stone
San Francisco and Napa Valley, California
Psychology (retired); Law (retired); Private investments
Contemporary art
Julia Stoschek
Berlin and Düsseldorf, Germany
Industry (automotive supplier)
Contemporary art, especially time-based media
Iris and Matthew Strauss
Rancho Santa Fe, California
Private real-estate investments (M.C. Strauss Company)
Contemporary art
Sylvia and Ulrich Ströher
Darmstadt, Germany
real estate, financial assets, private equity
German abstract postwar art; contemporary German painting
Brett and Daniel S. Sundheim
New York
Private money management
Contemporary art
Lisa and Steve Tananbaum
Palm Beach, Florida; Westchester, New York
Asset management
Postwar and contemporary art
Lauren and Benedikt Taschen
Berlin; Los Angeles
Publishing
Contemporary art, especially American, German, and British
Budi Tek
Jakarta, Indonesia; Shanghai
Philanthropy (Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum)
International contemporary art, especially Chinese and Western
Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani
Doha, Qatar
Inheritance
Modern and contemporary art
Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani
Doha, Qatar; London; New York
Inheritance; Investments (Qatar Investment Authority)
Postwar and contemporary art
David Thomson
Toronto
Media
Old Masters, modern and contemporary art
Steve Tisch
Los Angeles; New York
Film production (Escape Artists Productions); Professional football (New York Giants)
Modern and contemporary art
Anne and Wolfgang Titze
Arosa, Switzerland; Vienna
Business consulting
Minimalism and conceptual art
Jane and Robert Toll
Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Luxury homes (Toll Brothers)
French Impressionism; American art
Robbi and Bruce E. Toll
Palm Beach, Florida; Rydal, Pennsylvania
Luxury homes (Toll Brothers)
Elizabethan and Jacobean painting; Impressionism; post-Impressionism; 20th-century sculpture and painting; American art
Rose-Marie and Eijk van Otterloo
Naples, Florida
Investment fund
Dutch and Flemish Old Masters painting
Walter Vanhaerents
Brussels
Real estate; Construction
Contemporary art
Patricia Pearson-Vergez and Juan Vergez
Buenos Aires
Pharmaceuticals
International modern and contemporary art, especially Argentine
Francesca von Habsburg
Vienna
Philanthropy (founder and chairwoman, TBA21)
Contemporary art
Alice Walton
Fort Worth, Texas
Inheritance (Walmart)
American art; contemporary art
Wang Jianlin
Beijing
Real estate
Modern and contemporary art
Wang Wei and Liu Yiqian
Shanghai
Investments
Chinese art, scrolls, and porcelain; contemporary international art, including Chinese, Asian, European, and American
Wang Zhongjun
Beijing
Film production (Huayi Brothers Media)
modern art
Jutta and Siegfried Weishaupt
Laupheim, Germany
Industry (fuel technology)
Postwar and contemporary art, especially Abstract Expressionism, Zero, and Pop
Alain Wertheimer
New York
Fashion (Chanel)
Modern and contemporary art; Asian art
Abigail and Leslie H. Wexner
Columbus, Ohio
Retail (L brands)
Modern European art; contemporary American art
Reinhold Würth
Niedernhall, Germany; Salzburg, Austria
Industry (hardware)
Medieval art; Wunderkammer objects, especially ivory carvings, nautilus cups, and decorative tankards and boxes; postwar and contemporary art
Elaine Wynn
Las Vegas
Hotels, casinos
Modern and contemporary art
Stephen A. Wynn
Las Vegas
Casino resorts
Modern and contemporary art
Tadashi Yanai
Tokyo
Fashion retailing (Uniqlo)
Modern and contemporary art
Yang Bin
Beijing
Automobile dealerships
Modern and contemporary Chinese art
Anita and Poju Zabludowicz
London
Technology; Real estate
Contemporary art
Jochen Zeitz
Segera, Kenya
Investments
Contemporary African art and international art of the African diaspora
Helen and Sam Zell
Chicago
Investments
Modern and contemporary art, particularly Surrealism
Dasha Zhukova
London; Moscow; New York
Inheritance; Philanthropy (Garage Museum of Contemporary Art)
Postwar and contemporary art

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Artist Frank Kelley Jr. of FKJ Art Gallery – His 2015 visit to Grambling State University Art Department

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Kelley, an alumni with both Bachelor of Fine Arts & Business Management degrees, visited the universities art students and shared his work and the business of being an artist.


Last year Kelley also painted and sold limited edition prints of “World Famed” Grambling State University Marching Band and presented a check for a portion of the proceeds from the sale to the college previous President, Dr. Willie Larkin.
Available for commissioned work and more.

Learn more at http://www.frankkelleyjr.com/
#SPMGMMedia
FKJ Art Gallery
410 North 6th St Suite 2
West Monroe, LA
318-387-0043-Gallery
Tues-Fri 10-6pm
Saturday’s 10-4pm

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Oprah Winfrey is on a mission to make America listen again

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Oprah Winfrey joins 60 Minutes as special contributor, moderating a discussion organized by pollster Frank Luntz, of seven voters who supported Trump and seven who didn’t, eight months into Trump’s presidency. #SPMGMedia


Azzedine Alaïa bodysuit, $840, net-a-porter​.com, Brandon Maxwell pants, $995, Bergdorf Goodman, 754 Fifth Avenue, New York, Deborah Drattell Belts, $298, upon request, deborah@deborahdrattell​.com, Belperron belt buckle, price upon request, Belperron, 745 Fifth Avenue, New York, David Webb earrings, $55,000, David Webb, 942 Madison Avenue, New York. Photo: Mario Sorrenti for WSJ Magazine, styling by George Cortina

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Azzedine Alaïa dress, $5,780, boutique.moussy@alaia.fr, Belperron earrings, $74,500, Belperron, 745 Fifth Avenue, New York; Versace dress, price and availability upon request, 212-753-9008, Sidney Garber earrings, $6,800, Sidney Garber, 998 Madison Avenue, New York; Brandon Maxwell dress, price and availability upon request, sales@brandonmaxwellstudio​.com, Mikimoto earrings, $28,000, mikimotoamerica​.com; Azzedine Alaïa dress $5,780, boutique.moussy@alaia.fr, Belperron earrings, $74,500, Belperron, 745 Fifth Avenue, New York; Versace dress, price and availability upon request, 212-753-9008, Sidney Garber earrings, $6,800, Sidney Garber, 998 Madison Avenue, New York; Mikimoto earrings, $28,000, mikimotoamerica​.com Mario Sorrenti for WSJ. Magazine, styling by George Cortina

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Cancri Diamond Coin Token Enters ICO Phase, Entertainment Mogul Chris Stokes Lends Supports and Commits to UROC Secure Block

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(February 2, 2018) – The Cancri Diamond Coin (CCD) has successfully entered its main ICO phase after completing the pre-sale round. The main ICO begins February 1, 2018, and will end on February 28 with a total of 35 million tokens at stake. Noticing the significance of the UROC token, entertainment mogul Chris Stokes has now aligned himself with the UROC Secure Block technology with a significant purchase of CCD.

For anyone not familiar with the world’s first extra-terrestrial property sale, the CCD is the token to acquire virtual property on 55 Cancri E planetary system, a space located in the Cancer constellation 41 light years away, and legally owned by United Republic of Cancri, Inc. (UROC). The new token is available for just $0.55, and till date over 1.2 million CCDs have been sold in the pre-sale stage that ended January 31, 2018. The token sale also offers the IMTOKEN wallet app and a special discount for early birds.

Chris Stokes, well known for multi-platinum music ventures, global film projects, and more, has put his support firmly behind this groundbreaking venture. Chris is known for his knack of foreseeing the value of a solid business idea and is able to predict its inevitable success. He is now the proud owner of CCD coins, and has told UROC executives, “You are going to win with this!”

UROC is offering 200,000 acres of its Common Real Estate on 55 Cancri E for $100.00 per acre. Business property measuring 2,000 acres will be sold along with virtual property at $5,000 per acre. The offer will terminate 28 days from the date of this initial ICO. The virtual environment pioneered by the company is currently in development.

UROC is also solving a major issue with security that relates to decentralized technologies – securing the online assets and guarding against hackers. The new UROC Secure Block is a randomized encryption technology structured to fully secure online wallets for mining pools, exchanges, digital holdings, social sites, and more. The secure block server opens the door to decentralized, real property exchange, and will let participants’ game, trade and earn confidently, in an environment that is totally secured by the UROC Secure Block! This technology will be available for use by other exchanges, mining pools, and digital asset wallets, etc. UROC, Inc. is looking to add a new layer of security to the blockchain.

The United Republic of Cancri was incorporated in the State of Nevada on March 13, 2014 for the purpose of developing multiple places on the web for people to login safely, create a virtual version of themselves that can blend almost seamlessly with their reality. Users can use the website for exploring, dating, shopping, cryptocurrency mining, or simply meeting new people as well as, social interaction, and even physical purchases for their real lives with the confidence that their accounts are completely protected.

About UROC Secure Block – REAL WORLD VIRTUAL PLATFORM

UROC, Inc. is designing a website that will stand as a virtual representation of REAL PROPERTY located in the 55 Cancri planetary system using blockchain technology. This will be a website where members will use their customized avatars to navigate the site and cryptocurrencies to deepen their experience.

For more information, please visit: https://www.55Cancri.io

Media contact

Gina Johnson – Smith
United Republic of Cancri, Inc.
Phone: 775.553.8854
E-mail * Media@55Cancri.io
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

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Steve Wynn Resigns From Company Amid Sexual Misconduct Allegations

The casino mogul Stephen Wynn resigned Tuesday as chairman and chief executive of his company, Wynn Resorts, in response to sexual misconduct allegations spanning decades.

In a statement, Mr. Wynn said he was stepping down because “an avalanche of negative publicity” had created an environment “in which a rush to judgment takes precedence over everything else, including the facts.”

He will be replaced by Matt Maddox, who has been president of Wynn Resorts since 2013. Mr. Maddox joined the company in 2002 after working in corporate finance for what is now Caesars Entertainment.

Mr. Wynn, one of the most magnetic and polarizing figures in the gambling industry, was the subject of an in-depth Wall Street Journal investigationpublished late last month. The Journal found that Mr. Wynn, 76, had harassed female employees for decades and coerced them into sex.

Among other things, he was accused of demanding that women masturbate him or massage him naked. A manicurist said that when she went to his office for an appointment in 2005, he pressured her to disrobe, lie on his massage table and have sex. The woman told co-workers about the episode at the time and filed a human resources report. Ultimately, Mr. Wynn paid her a $7.5 million settlement, according to The Journal.

Mr. Wynn has denied all the allegations, calling them “preposterous.”

Within a day of the article’s publication, Mr. Wynn, a major Republican donor, stepped down as finance chairman of the Republican National Committee. A few days later, the University of Pennsylvania revoked his honorary degree and removed his name from a campus plaza and scholarship. And the Massachusetts Gaming Commission promised an investigation, as Wynn Resorts is building a multibillion-dollar casino outside Boston.

After Mr. Wynn announced his resignation on Tuesday, the commission said it would “need to assess the overall impact and implications of this significant development.”

Trading on shares of Wynn Macau was halted in Hong Kong early Wednesday in response to the announcement. Wynn Resorts’ stock price had already tumbled in response to the misconduct allegations, from $200.60 on Jan. 25 to $163.22 on Tuesday.

In a statement, the company’s board said it had accepted Mr. Wynn’s resignation “reluctantly.”

“Steve Wynn is an industry giant,” Boone Wayson, nonexecutive director of the board, said in the statement. “He is a philanthropist and a beloved leader and visionary. He played the pivotal role in transforming Las Vegas into the entertainment destination it is today.”

Mr. Wynn’s mark on Las Vegas is indelible. From the Mirage, which he opened in 1989, to the Bellagio and the soaring Wynn Hotel and Encore towers, he introduced the idea that visitors to the Strip were not there just to gamble. He also offered them top-of-the-line staterooms, fine dining and Rodeo Drive-level shopping.

He first arrived in Las Vegas as a young boy with his father, Mike Wynn, an East Coast bingo parlor operator. After his father died, Mr. Wynn and his wife at the time, Elaine Pascal, took over the business. He called out the numbers while she counted the cash.

In 1967, he bought a small stake in the Frontier casino. More deals would follow, including the takeover of the publicly traded Golden Nugget, which operated a run-down casino in downtown Las Vegas. Mr. Wynn started an ambitious renovation and expansion project that would ultimately lead him back east to oversee the construction of the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

But his rising stature in Las Vegas in the 1980s resulted in frequent regulatory inquiries and investigations into possible ties to organized crime. Mr. Wynn was always quick to point out that the various examinations found no wrongdoing.

His relationship with his ex-wife, a force of her own in Las Vegas, has been tumultuous. Married when they were teenagers — she was 18 and he was 19 — they divorced, remarried and divorced again in 2010. Ms. Wynn sat on Wynn Resorts’ board for years before she was removed in 2015.

Since 2012, the two have been locked in a legal battle over control of Ms. Wynn’s stake, valued recently at $1.6 billion, in Wynn Resorts. An agreement she signed with Mr. Wynn gives him the right to vote her stake in the company and limits her ability to sell her shares. A spokeswoman for Ms. Wynn declined to comment Tuesday evening.

His resignation may help stanch the bleeding for Wynn Resorts, which has a number of ambitious projects in the works. Besides the huge resort set to open next year in Boston Harbor, it is clearing land behind its Wynn and Encore hotels in Las Vegas for “Paradise Park,” a sandy waterfront around a 38-acre lagoon that is to include a casino, a hotel and restaurants. And in January, the company began laying out its vision for another 38-acre property it acquired late last year, a resort and casino called Wynn West.

Mr. Wynn is the latest in a growing series of prominent men, from actors to politicians to journalists, who have been accused of sexual harassment or assault since The New York Times published an exposé on the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein in October. Many have resigned or been fired as a result.

SOURCE: NY TIMES

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