Supreme Court declines to change double jeopardy rule in a case with Manafort implications

The Supreme Court on Monday said a person can be charged and tried in state and federal court for the same conduct without running afoul to the double jeopardy clause of the US Constitution because state and federal governments are separate sovereigns.

The case has implications for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, who is facing charges in New York State that are similar to the federal charges for which he has been tried.

The Supreme Court declined on Monday to change the longstanding rule that says putting someone on trial more than once for the same crime does not violate the Constitution’s protection against double jeopardy — a case that drew attention because of its possible implications for President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort.

The 7-2 ruling was a defeat for an Alabama man, Terance Gamble, convicted of robbery in 2008 and pulled over seven years later for a traffic violation. When police found a handgun in his car, he was prosecuted under Alabama’s law barring felons from possessing firearms. The local U.S. attorney then charged Gamble with violating a similar federal law. Because of the added federal conviction, his prison sentence was extended by nearly three years.

The Fifth Amendment says no person shall be “twice put in jeopardy of life or limb” for the same offense. But for more than 160 years, the Supreme Court has ruled that being prosecuted once by a state and again in federal court, or the other way around, for the same crime doesn’t violate the protection against double jeopardy because the states and the federal government are “separate sovereigns.”

The case attracted more than the usual attention because of the prospect that Trump may pardon Manafort, who was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison for violating federal fraud laws. A presidential pardon could free him from federal prison, but it would not protect him from being prosecuted on similar state charges, which were filed by New York. Overturning the rule allowing separate prosecutions for the same offenses would have worked in Manafort’s favor.

Gamble’s lawyer, Louis Chaiten of Cleveland, said the nation’s founders understood the protection against double jeopardy to ban any second prosecution for the same offense. Under English common law, the roots of American law, there was no “separate sovereigns” exception. A person could not be put on trial in England if already tried for the same offense in another country.

Chaiten also argued that the states and the federal government are not truly independent anyway and are instead part of a complete national system. He quoted Alexander Hamilton, who described them as “kindred systems, part of one whole.”

And Chaiten said Congress has made the problem worse by dramatically expanding the number and scope of federal laws in recent years, creating more duplication with state laws — something never envisioned in earlier court decisions that allowed double prosecutions.

But the Trump administration said the longstanding double jeopardy rule allows states and the federal government to pursue distinct interests without interfering with each other. Changing the current understanding by barring subsequent prosecutions would allow foreign court actions to preclude U.S. trials for crimes against Americans, the government said.

Civil liberties groups also said the rule has allowed the federal government to pursue notorious civil rights violations that states were unwilling or unable to pursue.

Gamble’s argument appealed to some of the court’s liberals and conservatives. Two years ago, conservative Justice Clarence Thomas joined liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in saying that the court’s past double jeopardy rulings were due for a “fresh examination.” #SPMGMedia#FollowSupremeCourtDecisions

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Fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt dies at 95

Gloria Vanderbilt, the New York-born fashion designer, heiress and socialite, died Monday at the age of 95, her son Anderson Cooper said.

Also a longtime actress, Vanderbilt became known for her line of fashions and perfumes bearing her name in the 1970s.

CNN, with Cooper reporting, aired her obituary Monday morning. He said that the family recently learned that Vanderbilt had advanced stomach cancer that had spread.

“Gloria Vanderbilt was an extraordinary woman, who loved life, and lived it on her own terms,” her son said. “She was a painter, a writer, and designer but also a remarkable mother, wife, and friend. She was 95 years old, but ask anyone close to her, and they’d tell you, she was the youngest person they knew, the coolest, and most modern.”

Vanderbilt and Cooper co-wrote “The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Loss and Love” in 2016.

 

The “poor little rich girl” heiress was at the center of a scandalous custody battle of the 1930s. She was the great-great-granddaughter of financier Cornelius Vanderbilt, and her life was recorded in sensational headlines from her childhood through four marriages.

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P&G Reimagines Creativity to Reinvent Advertising Through Innovative New Creative Partnerships

P&G debuts bold partnerships with John Legend and Arianna
Huffington’s Thrive Global, breakthrough creative work, and new
technology-enabled consumer experiences at the 2019 Cannes Lions
International Festival of Creativity

CANNES, France–(BUSINESS WIRE)–TheProcter
& Gamble Company
(NYSE:PG) today announced a series of
innovative new creative partnerships with John Legend, Arianna
Huffington’s Thrive Global, and others that reimagine creativity to
reinvent advertising at a time when change is needed.

Meeting growing consumer demand for authentic stories and experiences
that positively impact society and humanity, these partnerships embrace
the convergence of advertising, journalism, filmmaking, music, comedy,
and technology. They also bring together creative innovators who embrace
equality and inclusion to create more inspiring creativity that people
want to experience time and time again.

“For too long, the ad world has been in its own world – separate from
other creative industries and becoming less relevant to consumers. It’s
time to reimagine creativity to reinvent advertising,” said Marc
Pritchard, Chief Brand Officer, Procter & Gamble. “There are vast
sources of creativity available, and today P&G is taking action to merge
the ad world with other creative worlds though partnerships that embrace
humanity and broaden our view of what advertising could be.”

This week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, P&G
is calling on the industry to lead disruption by joining forces with
other creative worlds, and is announcing several new partnerships:

A creative partnership with John Legend that integrates multiple
genres to explore various aspects of humanity and the human experience –
such as parenthood, modern masculinity, music and social justice – with
P&G and its Pampers, Gillette and SK-II brands.

A humanity-based partnership with Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global, which
embeds “micro-step habit stacking” into P&G brands such as Oral-B and
Crest, Pampers, Venus, Secret and Pantene, blending cognitive and
behavioral science with life science to help consumers reduce stress and
improve daily health.

A courageous partnership with Saturday Morning, a
ground-breaking, socially conscious creative collective who, together
with P&G, will preview a new short film called “THE LOOK” that tackles
head on the issue of racial bias, building on the success of “The Talk”
which won several Lions, including a Grand Prix.

A collective partnership to relaunch Free the Bid into Free the Work,
a curated talent discovery service founded by award-winning filmmaker
Alma Har’el, designed for women and underrepresented creators to develop
new-to-the-world stories never experienced before – because creativity
loves diversity.

A creative partnership with GLAAD to celebrate all aspects of
human inclusion and expression, including a new film from Pantene that
updates the brand’s iconic “Don’t Hate Me Because I’m Beautiful”
campaign.

Technology partnerships that embed cutting-edge technology into
brands to create superior consumer experiences. The interactive P&G
LifeLab will open at Cannes featuring new P&G products and experiences
like Oral-B Sense, Olay Skin Advisor, SK-II FutureX Smart Store, My
Black is Beautiful, and an immersive virtual reality experience from
Verizon Media supported by content from HuffPost.

“Now more than ever, it’s critical that those of us with influence use
it to make a positive impact on the world. I’m committed to connecting
people, opening their hearts and minds and helping them see each other’s
concerns and aspirations,” said singer, song-writer, actor, activist and
producer John Legend. “We can change the game when we talk about
justice, community, family and how brands can create products and foster
conversations that make the world better. I’m happy to partner with a
company that strives to be a force for good in the world and develops
thought-provoking creative work that will drive change.”

“Great brands are habits for their consumers – and P&G’s brands are
daily habits for up to 5 billion consumers around the world,” said
Arianna Huffington, founder and CEO of Thrive Global. “Thrive’s
innovative partnership with P&G is focused on leveraging the daily habit
moments associated with P&G products – like brushing your teeth or
changing diapers – as a springboard for Thrive’s Microsteps,
scientifically-backed ways to reduce stress, improve health and increase
performance. Behavioral science shows that habit-stacking – attaching a
new habit to an existing habit so that it becomes a sustainable routine
– is the fastest way to build a new habit and make it stick. At a time
of unprecedented stress and burnout and a mental health epidemic, our
partnership represents a new and important way to deliver on our
missions of improving consumers’ lives and helping people lead
healthier, more fulfilled lives through the brands and products they
love and use every day.”

These partnerships build from the foundation P&G established last year
at Cannes:

A Katie Couric Media partnership, which has produced compelling
programs through humanity in journalism – including profiles of
accomplished women sponsored by P&G’s Olay, Secret and Pantene brands, a
short film about expectations of women with SK-II, a recent project with
Gillette on raising boys, and a smart daily newsletter, Wake-Up Call,
offering insights and commentary on the day’s top stories and lifestyle
features.

Last year P&G also introduced The Queen Collective with Queen
Latifah, Tribeca Studios and United Talent Agency to accelerate gender
and racial equality behind the camera by creating and distributing films
produced by multicultural women directors, starting with B’Monet’s Ballet
After Dark
and Haley Elizabeth Anderson’s If There is Light
short documentaries that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.

And P&G is partnering with National Geographic and Global
Citizen
to develop ACTIVATE, a documentary series that raises
awareness around extreme poverty, inequality and environmental
sustainability to mobilize global citizens to drive lasting change.

“When we partner with creative people who believe in the importance of
equality and inclusion, we can create stories like we’ve never
experienced before – because creativity loves diversity,” Pritchard
said. “And when we embrace creativity through humanity, we can literally
change the world by using our voices not only as a force for growth, but
as a force for good.”

About the P&G LifeLab

Visit the P&G Life Lab at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity June
17-21, 9:30-17:30 in Palais II. Originally debuted at the Consumer
Electronics Show in January 2019, the P&G LifeLab is an immersive
exhibit that showcases how we are combining breakthrough science and
technologies with deep consumer understanding to deliver connected
innovations and experiences that transform people’s lives.

About P&G

P&G serves consumers around the world with one of the strongest
portfolios of trusted, quality, leadership brands, including Always®,
Ambi Pur®, Ariel®, Bounty®, Charmin®, Crest®, Dawn®, Downy®, Fairy®,
Febreze®, Gain®, Gillette®, Head & Shoulders®, Lenor®, Olay®, Oral-B®,
Pampers®, Pantene®, SK-II®, Tide®, Vicks®, and Whisper®. The P&G
community includes operations in approximately 70 countries worldwide.
Please visit http://www.pg.com
for the latest news and information about P&G and its brands.

Digital Press Kit
https://news.pg.com/cannes-2019-press-kit

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Nas and Will Smith Invest in Mobile App to Help Teens Gain Financial Literacy

Nas and Will Smith have invested in a new banking app for teens that will help them gain financial literacy. The startup company behind the app is called Step, and the two celebs participated in a funding round of $22.5 million, according to TechCrunch.

The app will be attached to a MasterCard, and parents will be able to view their child’s transactions, add money and place restrictions on their account.

The services will also change as teens get older. For example, it’ll lend money for computers and books when they get into college.

The CEO and founder of Step, CJ MacDonald, said it makes sense to teach young people about money management through an app since most of them make purchases with their smartphones.

“Schools don’t teach kids about money,” he stated. “We want to be their first bank accounts with spending cards, but we also want to teach financial literacy and responsibility. Banks don’t tailor to this, and we want to be a solution teaching the next generation of adults to be more responsible with money in the cashless era. It was easy with cash to go to the mall, but now everyone is using their phone for Uber and more.”

The app will first be rolled out in the U.S. market, which reportedly has a little less than 50 million teenagers. MacDonald also said the app will give teens a sense of independence, even though their parents can still monitor their transactions.

Smith and Nas aren’t the only Black celebrities who’ve put their money toward helping young people gain financial literacy.

Last year, 21 Savage teamed up with the organization “Get Schooled” to teach kids about banking, and he also started the “21 Savage Bank Account Campaign” to help kids learn how to properly handle their money.

SOURCE: ATLANTA BLACK STAR

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Black-Owned Vegan Cookie Brand Secures $1 Million Investment From Jay-Z’s Venture Fund

Partake Foods, a Black-owned company that makes health-conscious and allergy-friendly food products, has recently secured a $1 million investment from Marcy Venture Partners, which is co-founded by fellow Black entrepreneur Jay-Z.
Denise Woodard, the company’s CEO and founder, started making healthy cookies when they found it hard to look for snacks that are both safe and tasty for her young daughter who was diagnosed with multiple food allergies.

When she realized that there is a market for her products, not only for allergy-prone consumers but also for those who are looking for gluten-free, vegan, and healthy foods, she left her position as the director of national sales at Coca-Cola in their Venturing & Emerging Brands division and she focused in launching the business.

“When I left my career at Coca-Cola in 2017, I literally sold cookies out of my car for six months, demoing every day and meeting store managers and customers,” Woodard said in a statement.

At first, she started funding her business through Kickstarter. Then she joined the round of funding from Marcy Venture Partners, the consumer-focused VC fund co-founded by Jay-Z, Jay Brown, and Larry Marcus. Eventually, other investors came including The Factory, Backstage Capital, SoFi Venture, and Chuck Muth, who is an executive in the meat alternative company, Beyond Meat.

Marcy Venture Partners particularly aims to support game-changing businesses and mass-market brands across consumer products and services. Partake Foods has proven to be a perfect fit for what they are looking for.

“Partake has the ingredients to build a mass market brand: compelling values, a great tasting product, and a tenacious and experienced operator. We are honored to back Denise and the team and help grow their business,” said Larry Marcus, Marcy Venture Partners co-founder and managing director.

The $1 million fund from MVP will be used to grow the Partake team, in which Woodard is the only full-time employee now. They also hope to add new pack size and further increase their growing targeted markets across the United States.

“Our products can now be found in over 300 stores, and we expect to finish this year with a new pack offering and in over 1,000 stores. We are so excited to collaborate with the MVP and Factory teams, as they both bring a wealth of knowledge in brand building and scaling consumer companies.”

For more information about Partake Foods, visit www.partakefoods.com

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Meet The First African American Lamborghini and McLaren Dealer

Thomas Moorehead initially wanted to pursue a career in education. He was at the peak of his career when he decided to take a risk in the automotive industry in 2001. And it turned out to be worth it as his company, Sterling Motorcars, became the first African-American Rolls Royce dealer in the world and first African-American Lamborghini and McLaren dealer in the United States. Even more, it still continues thriving throughout the years.

MMoorehead started out learning about the automotive industry from his mentor and fraternity brother James Bradley, who owns the Bradley Automotive Group. Bradley encouraged him to pursue the opportunity and said that he could be a millionaire through it.

Truthfully, Moorehead climbed up the ladder of success. He entered several dealer training programs using his own savings until he opened his first dealership in 1988. He eventually launched Sterling Motorcars in 2001.

With his good reputation and dedication to customer service, Moorehead caught the attention of Rolls Royce and became its first ever African-American dealer in the world. Since then, they have added the Mini Cooper, McLaren, and Lamborghini to their lineup. It has become the largest and leading luxury car retailer in Delaware, Southern Pennsylvania, and the Washington Metropolitan area.

“Sometimes you have to take a step back in order to take a step forward. If you want to get in this business, you have to be willing to start at the bottom and work your way to the top…”

Last year, Sterling Motorcars reportedly generated $632.2 million in revenue, which is the second highest for a minority-owned company in Greater Washington.

Moreover, Moorehead, who grew up economically disadvantaged, never forgets to give back to the community by sending students in need to college. Since 2004, through the Joyce and Thomas Moorehead Foundation, he has provided about $400,000 in scholarships to hundreds of high school students. He also regularly donates to HBCUs such as Grambling University, Bethune Cookman, and Howard University, among others.

“This is really what it’s all about, bringing other people up and giving something back.”

For more information about Sterling Motorcars, visit www.sterlingmotorcars.comoorehead started out learning about the automotive industry from his mentor and fraternity brother James Bradley, who owns the Bradley Automotive Group. Bradley encouraged him to pursue the opportunity and said that he could be a millionaire through it.

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Truthfully, Moorehead climbed up the ladder of success. He entered several dealer training programs using his own savings until he opened his first dealership in 1988. He eventually launched Sterling Motorcars in 2001.
With his good reputation and dedication to customer service, Moorehead caught the attention of Rolls Royce and became its first ever African-American dealer in the world. Since then, they have added the Mini Cooper, McLaren, and Lamborghini to their lineup. It has become the largest and leading luxury car retailer in Delaware, Southern Pennsylvania, and the Washington Metropolitan area.
“Sometimes you have to take a step back in order to take a step forward. If you want to get in this business, you have to be willing to start at the bottom and work your way to the top…”
Last year, Sterling Motorcars reportedly generated $632.2 million in revenue, which is the second highest for a minority-owned company in Greater Washington.
Moreover, Moorehead, who grew up economically disadvantaged, never forgets to give back to the community by sending students in need to college. Since 2004, through the Joyce and Thomas Moorehead Foundation, he has provided about $400,000 in scholarships to hundreds of high school students. He also regularly donates to HBCUs such as Grambling University, Bethune Cookman, and Howard University, among others.
“This is really what it’s all about, bringing other people up and giving something back.”
For more information about Sterling Motorcars, visit www.sterlingmotorcars.com

This Black-Woman Owned Architect And Engineer Company Is Breaking New Ground

It’s safe to say that most young girls don’t spend their weekends walking through construction sites in a hard hat, but Cheryl McKissack Daniel did. In 1905 her grandfather founded McKissack & McKissack Architects & Engineers, which provided the blueprint for her career.

The outfit is one of the oldest minority-owned professional design and construction firms in the United States, and when Daniel’s mom took the helm after her husband’s sudden illness, it became a woman-run construction company too.

In time Daniel would step up to head the family business herself, transforming it into McKissack & McKissack. In an industry in which there are still too few women and people of color, the president and CEO shares how she won multibillion-dollar contracts and made her mark.

Tell us about your path in the construction world.

Cheryl McKissack Daniel: When I was 12, my twin sister and I started going to work on Saturdays with our father, who was an architect and ran the family business. We would trace documents and walk construction sites. When it came time to go to college, my father told us, “You can go anywhere you want in the world, but I’m only paying for you to go to Howard University to study architecture.” We ended up at Howard, but I didn’t want to be an architect. I majored in engineering and went on to get a master’s degree in civil engineering. My first job was as a civil engineer designing silos for missiles.

Why did you decide to leave that industry for the family business?

Daniel: When I was in my early twenties, my father had a massive stroke, and my mom had to assume control. She called my boss and told him, “My daughter’s quitting today.” And I did, flying home to Nashville from New York City every week to help her. I’d fly back to New York on weekends, but that schedule was taxing on my marriage. So I decided to start the McKissack Group, which was initially separate from the family business but still in the area of construction management. We oversaw plans from design to execution. My company was beginning to get small roles on very large assignments, with our contracts totaling $90 million. Eventually my mom retired and I ended up taking over the original business, shutting down our offices in Alabama and Tennessee and running the whole operation from New York City.

How do you navigate being one of the few women
of color in your field?

Daniel: I was insulted in my own office recently. A man came in who didn’t believe we could handle big tasks. We were doing a joint venture with another construction firm on a new hospital for more than $700 million, and we were responsible for 40 percent of that. The man said to me, “All these joint ventures aren’t real. I’m sure the other company is doing all the work.” He couldn’t believe that minority- and women-owned businesses really do work in construction. And yet he was proposing to collaborate on a $25 million project. I turned him down, because I knew it would never be a real partnership.

You’ve been part of some major deals, like the recent $8 billion JFK Airport Terminal 1 project, on which your company is the project manager. What’s your secret to securing a contract?

Daniel: Construction is really a sales job first. Snagging contracts and bids is very much relationship-driven. People do business with people they know. I learned that I had to forge relationships with the right people to gain business. People know us, they know what we’re capable of doing and they know we have a track record. That’s how we nabbed the contract with New York City’s MTA Capital Program to provide audits on any construction project that’s more than $100 million.

What’s a typical day like for you?

Daniel: I have a lot of breakfast, lunch and dinner meetings. When I’m in the office, I meet with senior staff and put out fires. I also sign every check. I learned that the hard way. For a time I was hands-off, and someone else on my team was determining what got paid and what didn’t. That’s not always a good idea. If you have your own company, always keep your eye on the finances. Trust but verify—that’s how I run things.

Any advice for women looking to move up in their careers or strike out on their own?

Daniel: You need to define yourself. Don’t let other people define you. If we had let them do that, we would not be where we are today. When you’re moving up the ladder, whether you’re in a corporation or in your own business, a lot will come your way that can pull you off course. For example, we started out bidding on numerous projects and won several jobs. I could have stayed focused on our core services but instead I said, “No, we can handle it. We can get a bunch of bids.” Many of those jobs turned out great, but we had one that could have taken down the entire company. As a result, we went back to [the services we did best], and now we are thriving. Before, we were making $100 million a year but would end up with a loss of, say, $2 million. Now we’re doing
a little over $50 million in business, but we’re earning a profit of $3 million a year. The lesson I took from all that is that you have to stay centered on who you are and play to your strengths.

SOURCE: ESSENCE MAGAZINE

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Black-Owned Vegan Cookie Company Closes $1 Million from Jay-Z’s Venture Fund

Jay-Z has clearly been busy. Not only did he join the billionaire’s club, but the venture capital (VC) fund he co-founded recently led the round for allergy-friendly food startup, Partake Foods.

Partake Foods is a black-owned company that makes health-conscious food products. They closed a $1 million dollar round of seed funding. Founder Denise Woodard launched the business after her young daughter was diagnosed with multiple food allergies and their family struggled to find snacks that were healthy, safe, and tasty. Food allergies affect 4% – 6% of children and 4% of adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

However, Woodard says it’s not just the allergy-prone that are customers. The brand appeals to the health-conscious, the gluten-free community, and vegans.

Initially funding her business through Kickstarter, Woodard left her position as director, national sales at Coca-Cola in their Venturing & Emerging Brands division to run Partake full-time.

In addition to the round of funding from Marcy Venture Partners, the consumer-focused VC fund co-founded by Jay-Z, Jay Brown, and Larry Marcus—Partake landed other investors including The Factory, Backstage Capital, SoFi Venture, and Chuck Muth—an executive with meat alternative company, Beyond Meat.

“When I left my career at Coca-Cola in 2017, I literally sold cookies out of my car for six months, demoing every day and meeting store managers and customers,” said Woodard via a press release.

“Our products can now be found in over 300 stores, and we expect to finish this year with a new pack offering and in over 1,000 stores. We are so excited to collaborate with the MVP and Factory teams, as they both bring a wealth of knowledge in brand building and scaling consumer companies.”

The mission of Marcy Venture Partners is to seek to identify, access, and nurture top-tier entrepreneurs and companies. The co-founders have a passion for building game-changing businesses and mass-market brands across consumer products and services, digital media and technology, so Partake Foods was a seamless fit.

“Partake has the ingredients to build a mass market brand: compelling values, a great tasting product, and a tenacious and experienced operator. We are honored to back Denise and the team and help grow their business.”’ said Larry Marcus, Marcy Venture Partners co-founder, and managing director.

A seed round is traditionally the first major money invested into a company. The press release stated that the new infusion of capital will be used to grow the Partake team—Woodard is currently the only full-time employee—add new pack size offerings, and accelerate growth in their already flourishing targeted markets across the United States.

The products are currently available on Amazon.com, at some Whole Foods stores, Wegmans, and independent natural food stores across the country.

SOURCE: Black Enterprise

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What is D-Day? Remembering the storied 1944 invasion of Normandy

On June 6, 1944, an armada of 150,000 Allied soldiers landed on five beaches in Normandy, France. Their mission: to free Europe from Nazi control. It was the largest seaborne invasion in history, and included a collection of American, British, Canadian and Australian troops, with soldiers also coming from France, Czechoslovakia, Norway and Poland.

Launched as the “Operation Overlord” campaign, the battle that initiated the invasion of Normandy is forever etched in history by one word: D-Day.

Some historians consider it the single most important day in the 20th century. The attack had been planned for more than a year. The amphibious landings were supported by an airborne drop of 13,000 men later that night. More than 11,000 aircraft and 5,000 ships landed across the five Normandy beachheads, code-named Utah, Gold, Juno, Sword, and Omaha. The day was plagued by bad weather. Through it all, the attack remained a secret, one that surprised the Germans.

Upon landing, Allied soldiers encountered thousands of German soldiers dug into high-ground barracks with powerful 150 mm machine guns ready to clip them as they emerged off metal landing crafts. Hundreds of men died instantly; some drowned from the weight of their supply packs. Even if they survived Nazi gunfire, Allied troops encountered heavily fortified obstacles like wooden stakes, barbed wire and metal tripods.
The Allies would not be deterred. Between 4,000 and 9,000 Nazi troops were killed. By the end of the evening, the Germans were in retreat and the Allies had established control of the area.

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