Simone Biles makes more history at U.S. Gymnastics Championships

 

One night after becoming the first person ever to land a double-double dismount at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships, Simone Biles continued to make jaws drop on Sunday with more history.

Biles became the first woman to land a triple-double (two flips and three twists) in competition on the floor during her routine:

 

Are we sure that she is human?

Biles is on her way to winning her sixth U.S. championship on Sunday, and she would be just the second woman in history to accomplish that.

The 22-year-old was actually disappointed despite her historic performance on Saturday after she fell attempting the triple-double.

“As soon as I fell on floor, I was like, ‘That’s it, I’m scratching the meet. I’m walking off the floor,’ ” Biles said, via USA TODAY.

She continued: “I still get really frustrated because I know how good I am and how well I can do, so I just want to do the best routine for the audience and for myself out here.”

It’s that level of expectation and drive that has made Biles the best gymnast in the world and one of the greatest of all time.

SOURCE: YAHOO SPORTS

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DNA Test Shows Her Father Was Not Her Father

An Ohio family announced a lawsuit Wednesday, claiming a stranger’s sperm was used to create an embryo when a couple underwent in vitro fertilization(IVF) in 1994.
According to the complaint, Joseph Cartellone, of Delaware, Ohio, alleges he discovered earlier this year that he is not the biological father of his 24-year-old daughter, Rebecca, with his wife, Jennifer.

The family claims they made the discovery after Rebecca gave at-them home DNA kits last Christmas. They allege they received the results in late January and almost immediately noticed something was off.
“When we looked at the results, what we immediately noticed was that that there were no traces of Italian DNA in [Rebecca’s results] at all,” Cartellone told “Good Morning America” Wednesday. “And her DNA matched my wife’s pretty closely.”

Cartellone said he called the maker of the DNA kit thinking there had been a mistake, but after they walked him through the process, he believed the test was accurate. According to the lawsuit, he and Rebecca later underwent a legal paternity test that confirmed he is not her biological father.
“My disbelief turned quickly to shock and then ultimately to anger that this could possibly be the case,” Cartellone said.

Joseph Cartellone speaks during a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington D.C., Aug. 7, 2019.
The Cartellone family used the results of the DNA test to trace Rebecca’s biological father to a “handful of individuals,” one of whom worked at Christ Hospital, which is named defendant in the lawsuit, one of the family’s attorneys, Joseph Peiffer, said at a news conference Wednesday.

In addition to Christ Hospital, the lawsuit was also filed against the Institute for Reproductive Health and Ovation Fertility in Cincinnati.
“While we are evaluating the allegations surrounding events alleged to have occurred in the early 1990’s, it is The Christ Hospital Health Network’s practice to not publicly comment on pending litigation,” the health network told ABC News in a statement.

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From A Working Mother To The First Black Entrepreneur To Start A Carpool Service For Kids, She Is An Example Of Black Excellence

As a working mother of three, Shan Cureton understood the troubles of parenting and the evergrowing anxiety that comes with it. The daily juggle between the office and her son’s school left her thinking about the numerous other parents who can’t possibly keep a track of their children’s whereabouts and well-being in their absence. To address this issue, she started a full-time rideshare service for kids, Kiddie Commute in 2017, around the Greater San Diego area. According to blacknews.com It is the only black-woman owned transportation service in the state which focuses on caregiving, safety, and trustworthiness.
“I am a busy working mother. At the time, I worked and went to school full time. My youngest son was in Kindergarten, I had another son in middle school, and a daughter in high school. It was challenging picking up my youngest son from class in the middle of the day when I had to work or be in class,” Cureton stresses that the launch of Kiddie Commute was inevitable as it was driven by need.

From A Working Mother To The First Black Entrepreneur To Start A Carpool Service For Kids, She Is An Example Of Black Excellence

Mother of three and the first black entrepreneur to own a rideshare business in California, Shan Cureton is an inspiration to many.

As a working mother of three, Shan Cureton understood the troubles of parenting and the evergrowing anxiety that comes with it. The daily juggle between the office and her son’s school left her thinking about the numerous other parents who can’t possibly keep a track of their children’s whereabouts and well-being in their absence. To address this issue, she started a full-time rideshare service for kids, Kiddie Commute in 2017, around the Greater San Diego area. According to blacknews.com It is the only black-woman owned transportation service in the state which focuses on caregiving, safety, and trustworthiness.

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“I am a busy working mother. At the time, I worked and went to school full time. My youngest son was in Kindergarten, I had another son in middle school, and a daughter in high school. It was challenging picking up my youngest son from class in the middle of the day when I had to work or be in class,” Cureton stresses that the launch of Kiddie Commute was inevitable as it was driven by need.

Image: Shan Cureton

This was not it, she mentions that watching drivers pick up her most precious assets made her nervous, restless and all she could do was hope for their safe return, “because let’s face it, they were strangers.” “Some drivers would anyway, and some would cancel the ride when they found out it was a child they were picking up. I searched online for a company that could solve my problem, there wasn’t a local one, and that’s when the light bulb went on. Kiddie Commute was born.”

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Galaxy Fold: Samsung will relaunch the foldable phone in September

Sixty-nine days after it was supposed to go on sale, Samsung announced a new release window for the Galaxy Fold, its first-ever foldable phone. Or rather, a release month: September. And only in select countries, as initially planned. Samsung said it would share specific sale dates as the month nears — we’d guess as early as August. With this announcement, the world’s largest phone-maker has at long last broken its silence about the nearly $2,000 device, which has been delayed since April 22 after reviewers reported screen breakages, flickering and bulging.

Although the Galaxy Fold preorders sold out on the first day, the phone never officially went on sale, and no preorder money was collected. CNET’s review unit didn’t break, though it did experience minor damage to the screen. The Fold costs $1,980, which converts to about £1,500 or AU$2,800.

In addition to a new launch window, Samsung also said it fixed the problems that caused some reviewers’ phones to break in the first place. The fixes include:

  • A protective top layer that extends beyond the bezel, “making it apparent that it is an integral part of the display structure,” not a dust guard you’d want to remove.
  • “Reinforcements” to keep debris from working its way underneath the screen.
  • New “protection caps” to strengthen the top and bottom of the hinge area, which had revealed natural gaps where particles could get in.
  • Metal reinforcements beneath the screen (the Infinity Flex Display), presumably to make the plastic screen stiffer.
  • Reducing the air gap between the Fold’s body and hinge.

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2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Stingray Unveiled

The crowd audibly gasped as General Motors president Mark Reuss said prices for the radically new 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingraywill start under $60,000, astoundingly close to the outgoing model’s $55,900 base price.

Reuss also said ‘Vettes with even more performance than the 495-horsepower model GM revealed in a World War II-era blimp hangar are coming soon. He dodged questions about which names from Corvette’s storied history the cars would have, and what technologies they’d use to beat the 2020 Z51 model’s already announced sub-three-second zero-60 mph time.

T

he new Corvette is the most radical engineering change in the car’s 66-year history. Its engine is mounted behind the passenger compartment. The layout helps the car put its power on the road and improves handling.

Other crowd-pleasing features:
  • An adjustable suspension with a GPS-linked memory to recognize and raise the car’s nose when the Stingray approaches steep driveways, familiar speed bumps, potholes, etc. The memory can remember up to 1,000 places and raise the nose 1.6 inches in 2.4 seconds at up to 24 mph. Like a lot of sporty cars, previous Corvette’s low-slung nose trim was frequently damaged by parking blocks and other obstacles.
  • A new electronic system that will enable features like GM’s Super Cruise system, which allows hands-free driving on more than 3 million miles of roadway.
  • Video that showed the new ‘Vette’s two cargo compartments — one in the nose, one behind the engine — holding two golf bags or a five-piece luggage set that was designed to fill the previous model’s roomy hatchback.
  • Slides showing a choice of six interior color themes and 12 exterior colors.

Dealers are taking orders now. Chevy may deliver a few cars late this year. Dealers should have good stocks on hand early in 2020.

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Stroke research: UCLA study finds 15 minutes can make huge difference

Jacqueline Knowles of Culver City was having a stroke. The 74-year-old remembers the paramedic not wasting any time.
“He didn’t wait for the gurney,” she said, “He picked me up in his arms and he took me downstairs.”
In 8 minutes flat, first responders got her to the emergency department at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.
UCLA professor of interventional neuro-radiology Dr. Reza Jahan said, “From the time she arrived in the hospital to the time we were doing the procedure, it was under one hour. So pretty fast.”
The faster you get into the hospital and into treatment, the better the outcome. But, what exactly does that mean in the real world? That’s what UCLA researchers wanted to find out.
“If you do 15 minutes faster? Thirty minutes faster?,” Jahan asked. “How does that translate into better outcomes?”

Study Co-lead author Dr. Jahan and his colleagues looked at 7,000 stroke cases. They discovered 15 minutes truly matters. For every 1,000 stroke patients, they found:
“Seventeen more patients being able to walk when they leave the hospital. Eighteen more patients having no disability when they leave the hospital. Twenty-one more patients being able to go home and 15 fewer deaths, ” Jahan said.

The team also looked at where patients can gain those precious minutes. The first hurdle is people not recognizing the symptoms. Remember the acronym FAST. “F” is for Face. Look out for drooping on one side or the other. “A” stands for arm. When your arm is weak or numb. The “S” stands for speech when your speech is off or you can’t understand speech. And “T” is for time to call 911.

Another hurdle is decreased hospital staffing during nights and weekends. It’s an issue Jahan said hospitals need to examine. But the study found treatment times were much faster in larger hospitals with certified stroke programs.

“It’s very, very important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of stroke and to call 911 immediately to get to the right place for treatment,” Jahn said. “Look at the difference 15 minutes can make.”

Knowles made a complete recovery.

She said, “Hurry up as fast as you can. Get them to the hospital because doctors told me that’s what saved my life.”

The paper’s other UCLA authors are Dr. Jeffrey Saver, a professor of neurology and director of the Comprehensive Stroke and Vascular Neurology Program at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, co-lead author of the study, and Dr. Gregg Fonarow, the Eliot Corday Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine and Science and director of the Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

SOURCE: ABC

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SPMG MEDIA PEOPLE: Curator Denise Murrell

Denise Murrell is the curator of the successful exhibition Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet to Matisse and Beyond at Columbia University’s Wallach Art Gallery, and co-curator of the exhibition’s expansion at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, as the Wallach’s first Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Research Scholar. She is the author of the New York exhibition catalogue, to be published by Yale University Press. Murrell is involved in initiatives to create greater diversity within the curatorial and academic professions of art history, and to develop exhibition programs that introduce overlooked narratives of interest to new and broader museum audiences.

The New York and Paris exhibitions are based on Murrell’s 2013 doctoral dissertation at Columbia, where she has taught the course Masterpieces of Western Art, and received a PhD in art history in February 2014.

Murrell was previously managing director of the Institutional Investor Research Group, Euromoney Institutional Investor Plc (1995-2005), as profiled in the HBS case “The 1995 Release of the Institutional Investor Research Report: The Impact of New Information” (Groysberg, Nohria and Haas: 2007). She held other positions in finance and consulting after receiving an MBA from HBS and a BS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, including executive director of the Institutional Investor International Investment Forum; corporate finance and marketing positions at Citicorp Investment Bank in New York and London; and as an analyst at Morgan Stanley prior to HBS.

She currently serves on the National Advisory Board for the Ackland Art Museum at UNC Chapel Hill, where she is treasurer of the Select Committee; and was previously on the board of ArtsConnection, an organization providing arts programming to students in the New York City public school system. She is a member of the Association of Art Museum Curators, ArtTable (a leadership organization for professional women in the visual arts), the College Art Association, and the Museum of Modern Art Friends of Education. For several years while completing her PhD, Murrell was a pro bono strategic consultant for NYC arts nonprofits with Community Partners of the Harvard Business School Alumni Club.

Murrell’s publications and conference papers as an independent art historian (Project New Muse) include “Laure of Olympia and More: Manet and 19th Century Black Paris (2017); “The Anterior as Muse: Recent Paintings by Mickalene Thomas” (2012); “Resituating Identity in Yinka Shonibare’s Jardin d’Amour” (2010); and “African Influences in Modern Art” for the Metropolitan Museum Timeline of Art History (2008). She held a Mellon predoctoral fellowship at Princeton University Art Museum, was a contract lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and a dissertation fellow at Columbia’s Reid Hall Paris.

Learn more, CLICK HERE

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Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today & Le Modèle noir, de Géricault à Matisse

A recent New York City art exhibition, now at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, explores the importance of black models as key to the development of 19th and 20th-century art, through their representations by French and American artists (including Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Frederic Bazille and Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault). Nancy Giles talks with curator Denise Murrell about how the Harlem Renaissance influenced painters such as Henri Matisse, and with Brooklyn artist Mickalene Thomas about black figures in art at a time of social and political transformation.

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About the Exhibition

This exhibition explores the changing modes of representation of the black figure as central to the development of modern art. The models’ interactions with and influences on painters, sculptors and photographers are highlighted through archival photographs, correspondence and films. The artists featured in the exhibition depicted black subjects in a manner counter to typical representations of the period. The works included highlight the little-known, multiracial aspect of each artist’s milieu.

In New York, the presentation focuses specifically on the black female figure, beginning with Edouard Manet’s 1860s portrayals of Laure, the model who posed as the maid in Olympia. In Paris, a broader and expanded treatment of the black figure begins with portaits by Marie-Guillemine Benoist and Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault at the start of the 19th century.

In both New York and Paris, the exhibition explores the work of Manet’s Impressionist-era cohort, including Frédéric Bazille, Edgar Degas and the photographer Nadar; sculptors including Charles Henri Joseph Cordier and Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux; paintings, drawings and prints of Henri Matisse (before and after his 1930s Harlem visits); the portraiture of diverse artists of the Harlem Renaissance, including Charles Alston and William H. Johnson; and the legacy of these depictions for successive generations of postwar modern and contemporary artists, from Romare Bearden through to the current moment.

By taking a multidisciplinary approach that focuses on the connection between the history of art and the history of ideas, the exhibition will study aesthetic, political, social and racial issues as well as the realm of the imagination—all of which is revealed in the representation of black figures in visual arts from the French and American abolition eras to the present day.

Denise Murrell

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Serena and Venus may be tennis excellence personified, but don’t forget Richard

The sisters are the most accomplished sports siblings in history thanks in large part to the courage and fire of their father

Serena Williams was gathering her things to walk off the court after her 6-2 6-3 victory over Johanna Konta on Jan. 25 when Rennae Stubbs, who conducted the postmatch interview, said something to the crowd that just didn’t sound right.

“Ladies and gentlemen, world No. 2, Serena Williams.”

It was odd hearing the greatest to ever do it be referred to as second best. And one could infer from the manner in which Williams’ once toothy smile slowly evaporated that she wasn’t particularly fond of the characterization either. Nonetheless, since Angelique Kerber won the U.S. Open in September 2016, that had been the reality: Williams was not No. 1. The index finger she normally raised high in the air after a victory, a tad hollow.

It was in that moment that I knew she was going to win the Australian Open. Some people are masters at hiding how they really feel. Williams — like former first lady Michelle Obama — never struck me as someone who bothered playing that game.

Yet as the accolades continue to pour in celebrating her achievements as well as those of her ageless sister Venus Williams, there is one name that should not be forgotten.

Britain Wimbledon Tennis

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